Two-Blade Turbines the Future of Offshore Wind Energy? – The Maritime Executive

The benefits of two-bladed turbines include cheaper construction because they require fewer less material to construct and are easier to install. Industry leaders estimate that two-bladed turbines could cost about 20 percent less to construct and install while still generating the same amount of power as three-bladed turbines.

Removing the third blade makes the rotor lighter and allows engineers to place the rotor on the downside of the tower. In addition, two-bladed rotors are often easier to install than three-bladed turbines which must be constructed on-site. Because they often weigh up to 40 tons less than conventional rotors, two-bladed rotors can be built onshore and transported to its designated location on a ship because it is light enough to be lifted onto the tower.   

Sourced through Scoop.it from: maritime-executive.com

See on Scoop.itTurbines Design & Power

Microturbines take on the market – Cogeneration & On-Site Power Production Magazine

COSPP spoke with two microturbine firms at opposite ends of the market spectrum – one the established market leader, with an 85% market share; one a new sector entrant with significant market potential – to discover the commonalities and differences in how each has strategised its market approach.

Jim Crouse, Executive Vice-President of Sales and Marketing at microturbine manufacturer Capstone Turbine, says he ‘would agree with’ Navigant’s analysis. Although increased shale gas availability in the US ‘hasn’t been as impactful on the cogen side,’ he notes, it has ‘certainly been helpful from an oil and gas perspective.’

Once MTT had developed its technology, he continues, ‘we needed to focus on a particular market. We had chosen micro-cogeneration, a common and large market, and also a market where the specific advantages of the microturbine are very important.’ Micro-cogeneration, he says, has ‘been around for 10 to 15 years now with no real breakthrough: the available systems are too expensive and/or the maintenance costs are too high.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.cospp.com

See on Scoop.itMicro generation – Energy & Power systems

Shipboard Waste Heat Recovery Technology – MarineLink

Calnetix Technologies, LLC has published a White Paper describing new processes for producing supplemental power for a ship’s |

 

Waste heat from the engines is an underutilized source of power that can be harnessed to augment electricity produced by the ship’s generators,” said Calnetix CEO Vatche Artinian. “While heat from the engine exhaust is already being used to generate steam on many ships, it has been difficult to harvest heat from lower-temperature sources, such as the engine coolant. Hydrocurrent™ technology aims to remove this barrier and tap into the low-grade jacket-water heat to generate additional electrical power without increasing fuel consumption.”
 
“Test data reveal that Hydrocurrent can produce up to 125 kW of electrical power from a temperature source as low as 80⁰C, saving up to 200 tons of bunker fuel and reducing carbon monoxide emissions by 18 tons per year by reducing the load on the ship’s bunker-burning diesel generators,” he added.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.marinelink.com

See on Scoop.itHeat energy recovery technology

ARC reactor design uses superconducting magnets to draw fusion power closer – Gizmag

Fusion power can seem a bit like the last bus at night; it’s always coming, but never arrives. MIT is working to change that with a new compact tokamak fusion reactor design based on the latest commercially available magnetic superconductor technology. The ARC (affordable, robust, compact) reactor design promises smaller, cheaper reactors that could make fusion power practical within 10 years.MIT’s new compact tokamak fusion reactor design is based on the latest magnetic superconductor technology. The ARC (affordable, robust, compact) reactor design promises smaller, cheaper reactors that could make fusion power practical within 10 years.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.gizmag.com

See on Scoop.itMicro generation – Energy & Power systems

Solar Organic Rankine Cycle Power System for Developing Countries

Solar Organic Rankine Cycle Power System for Developing Countries, 978-3-659-76734-0, The concept of appropriate technology has been addressed for electricity production in remote areas of developing countries through the solar ORC technology.

 

The concept of appropriate technology has been addressed for electricity production in remote areas of developing countries through the solar ORC technology. The selection of working fluids plays an important role in ORC system. R245fa and R134a are recommended for power generation. In addition, R245fa works well for the heat source temperature of the range 100-120°C whereas R134a below 100°C. Vacuum type solar collector is used for obtaining the hot water which can produce the temperature of 120°C. The commercial scroll expander that adopt magnetic coupling has been used in the experiment. The experimental investigation of the small-scale ORC showed acceptable characteristics for the temperature of the 120°C that uses R245fa working fluid. The system efficiency is 8.5 % with the power output of 1.4 kW. From the economic point of view the solar ORC system cannot recover its investment until 19 years of installation and operation currently without any subsidies. The concept in this book is helpful for solar ORC developers, manufacturers, energy planners, rural practitioners, different aid and donor agencies for adopting the sustainable energy system technology.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.morebooks.de

See on Scoop.itHeat energy recovery technology