Distribution Energy Generation (DEG) Market (On grid, Off grid), by Technology … – PR Web (press release)

Market Size -$ 113.53 bn in 2013, Market Growth – CAGR of 6.8%, Market Trends – Growing energy demand in Asia to drive growth new report by Grand View Research. View complete report with TOC

 

Further key findings from the study suggest: 

The global installed capacity for DEG was 102.97 GW in 2013 and is expected to reach 227.63 GW by 2020, growing at a CAGR of 12.0% from 2014 to 2020.CHP was the most dominant technology in the DEG market with installed capacity of 44.50 GW in 2013. However, solar PV was the largest segment of the market in terms of revenue due to the high cost and large installed base. The solar PV revenue in DEG was USD 55.90 billion in 2013 and is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6.4% from 2014 to 2020.Commercial and industrial installations of DEG were the largest end-use segment, accounting for 76.55 GW of global installed capacity in 2013. However, building and residential applications of DEG is expected to be the fastest growing segment of the market, at an estimated CAGR of 13.5% from 2014 to 2020.Europe has the largest installed capacity for DEG, exceeding 41.00 GW in 2013; owing to stringent regulatory scenario resulting in high preference towards DEG. Asia Pacific is expected to be the fastest growing regional market, at an estimated CAGR of 12.7% from 2014 to 2020 owing to increasing energy demand from India and China.The key companies in the market include First Solar Inc., General Electric Energy LLC, FuelCell Energy Inc., Ballard Power Systems Inc., JA Solar Holdings Co. Ltd., Sharp Corp., Ingersoll-Rand plc, Suntech Power Holdings Co. Ltd., Siemens AG, Yingli Green Energy Holding Co. Ltd. and UTC Power LLC.

Source: www.prweb.com

Holroyd Precision Components gets to the heart of energy recovery – Rochdale Online

Rochdale Online Holroyd Precision Components gets to the heart of energy recovery Rochdale Online Additionally, unlike conventional turbines, the Heliex process can deliver energy from wet steam, thus eliminating the need for costly timing gears… Based on the proven twin rotary screw principle, the expanders convert waste heat to energy via a simple and cost-effective Rankine Cycle (the mathematical formula used to predict the performance of steam engines). Additionally, unlike conventional turbines, the Heliex process can deliver energy from wet steam, thus eliminating the need for costly timing gears and other expensive components, such as refrigerants as used in ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) systems.

Source: www.rochdaleonline.co.uk

CSP plants could run at 80% capacity (or better) throughout the year – Gizmag

Ars Technica
CSP plants could run at 80% capacity (or better) throughout the year
Gizmag
The big advantage here is that the heated liquid itself can also be seen as an energy storage system.

 

The researchers say that a network of CSP power plants spread out over a large area makes sure that even if the sun doesn’t shine for long periods of time, the system is still able to support large-scale energy needs by dispatching energy where it is needed.

This is the first detailed study of its kind to establish that it is indeed possible to build a power grid which relies primarily on solar energy and still provides reliable electricity around the clock, day at night, and throughout the year. Moreover, the costs per kWh might start dropping dramatically over the next few years.

“The costs of CSP, even in their least cost configuration, are currently higher than gas (roughly 10 cents per kWh, compared to about 5 cents),” Patt told us. “But that will almost certainly change if CSP becomes more mainstream, and it is reasonable to imagine that it will be as cheap as gas within the next 10 to 15 years. In a sense, our latest results provide a reason for energy system planners to push CSP to the point where this [cost reduction] will happen.”

Source: www.gizmag.com