BINE Informationsdienst: Projektinfo: Vacuum tank stores heat

An efficient long-term heat storage tank boosts the shares of fraction of solar thermal energy systems in buildings. Staff at Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research and at steel and metal engineering company Hummelsberger have developed a storage system that minimises thermal losses and optimises temperature stratification. A vacuum between the inner and outer tank combined with a perlite powder filling reduces the thermal conductivity of the storage tank shell. The long-term heat storage tank is already being used for heat supply in single-family homes and apartment buildings. – See more at: http://www.bine.info/en/publications/projektinfos/publikation/vakuumtank-speichert-waerme/?__scoop_post=e178b130-a2ae-11e4-9d4e-001018304b75&__scoop_topic=1469668#__scoop_post=e178b130-a2ae-11e4-9d4e-001018304b75&__scoop_topic=1469668

Source: www.bine.info

See on Scoop.itMicro generation – Energy & Power systems

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Small engine packs a punch

Noise, excessive vibration and relative inefficiency are drawbacks of the piston-based internal combustion engines (ICE) that power today’s lawn and garden equipment, such as leaf blowers and lawn trimmers. But now Massachusetts Institute of Technology startup LiquidPiston has developed a rotary ICE that it says is significantly smaller, lighter and quieter, as well as 20% more fuel-efficient than the ICEs used in small-engine devices.

Source: www.rdmag.com

See on Scoop.itHeat energy recovery technology

Focused Sun + Xiang Yang Institute Partnering To Bring Solar Microgrids To China – CleanTechnica

Following the relatively recent news that China and the US have agreed to stronger carbon-emissions goals, a Chinese entity by the name of Xiang Yang Institute and a US-based company called Focused Sun have announced that they are partnering to develop solar microgrids in China (and elsewhere).

The upside to solar microgrid use in the country is the potential there to cut down notably on coal use, and the associated carbon emissions — as well as adding local resiliency against grid outages, market fuel-costs, etc.

The Xiang Yang Institute’s Dean Jihong Chen commented on the partnership thusly: “Focused Sun has squeezed the cost out of solar concentrators, the key part of the microgrid system that focuses sunlight. Together with thermal storage and Chinese turbogenerators, we can produce small power plants for microgrids.”

Through the use of reflected solar energy, mineral oil can be easily (and relatively cheaply) heated to the 300°C temperatures that are needed for modern turbogenerators — this thermal storage can then hold the heat to be used at night, or the next day.

Source: cleantechnica.com

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5 Ways Your Tech Will Go Green in 2015 – Live Science

Smart-home technologies aren’t new, but they might finally find their niche in the new year, said Michael Nardi, president of GreenTech Consulting, an Indiana-based company that provides technology and clean-energy consulting to businesses. In 2015, both home and business owners will rely more heavily on Internet-connected products such as smart thermostats, Nardi told Live Science.

 

Not all of the green technologies due to take off in 2015 are based on computing power. Some of them run on an older power source: the sun.

Joule is a Massachusetts-based company that harvests the energy in sunlight to create fuels such as ethanol, diesel and gasoline. In the company’s specially engineered photosynthesis process, nonpotable water is combined with microbes that produce particular fuels when exposed to sunlight and carbon dioxide.

Known as artificial photosynthesis, this method of creating fuels and chemicals could one day curb society’s need for fossil fuels. It’s also a process that demonstrates the many potential uses of solar energy, according to Peters.

Source: www.livescience.com

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How it Works. A Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Tower with Heat Storage

A solar thermal power station is much like a coal,natural gas or even nuclear power station once the source of heat has been established. Of course if we consider emissions or safety for each of these options Solar Thermal is the clear winner.  For the Solar Thermal power plant the source of heat is the sun.

 

Molten salt is used to collect and store the sun’s energy as heat. Cold salt at 290 degree C, is pumped from the cold salt tank up the tower to the collector where it is heated to around 600 degrees C. It then descends to the hot salt tank where the heat can be stored for use during the night or pass on to the boiler for immediate use.

Source: solarthermalmagazine.com

See on Scoop.itHeat energy recovery technology