Energy Innovation Case Studies: How Top Gun Eased Wind, Solar Integration

See on Scoop.itTurbines

As variable generation from wind and solar power increases and peak loads grow and become more volatile, the U.S. electric grid will rely more and more on gas-fired power to maintain system flexibility. Often at the core of these gas-fired power plants are aeroderivative turbines, whose fast-start and cycling capabilities allow for frequent on-again, off-again operation while retaining generating efficiency.

These turbines are directly derived from jet engines—hence the name, “aeroderivative.”  GE, Pratt & Whitney, and Rolls Royce are the three major manufacturers of aeroderivative gas turbines, and each of their models is descendant from a specific aircraft engine they previously developed.  As a result, aircraft engine research and development (R&D) has effectively served as aeroderivative gas turbine R&D.  The development and tremendous gains in performance in these turbines are largely due U.S. military investment—as illustrated in the latest case study from the American Energy Innovation Council’s series on the role of the government in energy technology innovation and previewed in this article.

See on theenergycollective.com

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Energy Innovation Case Studies: How Top Gun Eased Wind, Solar Integration

See on Scoop.itOrganic Rankine Cycle

As variable generation from wind and solar power increases and peak loads grow and become more volatile, the U.S. electric grid will rely more and more on gas-fired power to maintain system flexibility. Often at the core of these gas-fired power plants are aeroderivative turbines, whose fast-start and cycling capabilities allow for frequent on-again, off-again operation while retaining generating efficiency.

These turbines are directly derived from jet engines—hence the name, “aeroderivative.”  GE, Pratt & Whitney, and Rolls Royce are the three major manufacturers of aeroderivative gas turbines, and each of their models is descendant from a specific aircraft engine they previously developed.  As a result, aircraft engine research and development (R&D) has effectively served as aeroderivative gas turbine R&D.  The development and tremendous gains in performance in these turbines are largely due U.S. military investment—as illustrated in the latest case study from the American Energy Innovation Council’s series on the role of the government in energy technology innovation and previewed in this article.

See on theenergycollective.com

Researchers devise method to suppress thermal conductivity to improve thermoelectric materials for waste heat recovery

See on Scoop.itMicrogeneration

A new study published in the journal Nature Materials has found a way to suppress the thermal conductivity in sodium cobaltate so that it can be used to harvest waste energy, with potential applications such as automotive waste heat recovery.

The need for both high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity creates a design conflict for thermoelectric systems, leading to the consideration of materials with complicated crystal structures. Rattling of ions in cages results in low thermal conductivity, but understanding the mechanism through studies of the phonon dispersion using momentum-resolved spectroscopy is made difficult by the complexity of the unit cells.

We have performed inelastic X-ray and neutron scattering experiments that are in remarkable agreement with our first-principles density-functional calculations of the phonon dispersion for thermoelectric Na0.8CoO2, which has a large-period superstructure. We have directly observed an Einstein-like rattling mode at low energy, involving large anharmonic displacements of the sodium ions inside multi-vacancy clusters. These rattling modes suppress the thermal conductivity by a factor of six compared with vacancy-free NaCoO2. Our results will guide the design of the next generation of materials for applications in solid-state refrigerators and power recovery.

See on www.greencarcongress.com

The Future of 3-D Printing With General Electric – DailyFinance

See on Scoop.ite-Manufacturing

The future of additive manufacturing has many naysayers and advocates. Many believe it will change the face of manufacturing in the near future, while others think the technology has a long way to go before it’s capable of large-scale industrial applications. General Electric is in the former camp and has embarked on a mission to make history by using the technology for large-scale manufacturing of its fuel nozzles for the engines in Boeing’s 737 MAX airplane. Investors in additive manufacturing should take note of these developments, as any moves that a company the size of GE makes will surely affect the entire industry.

See on www.dailyfinance.com

Simulation for Small Businesses, Part 1 by Desktop Engineering

See on Scoop.itTurbines

 Companies developing software for analyzing mechanical and/or fluid designs are scrambling to get a piece of the SMB action — and that’s paying off to your benefit. They now offer manageable simulation tools that work when your budget is modest (some well below $15,000) and when your analysis “staff” is also responsible for CAD, soldering and printer repair.

DE challenged a number of companies plus a university to detail just what they’re doing to make such simulations intuitive, flexible and affordable for non-experts.

 

See on www.deskeng.com